Skip to main content

#IMMOOC Week 1

My random thoughts & answers to this week's questions posted in regards to The Innovator's Mindset by George Couros.  

Follow along with the questions & discussion at immooc.org/
screen-shot-2016-09-17-at-12-38-27-pm


1.  What do you see as the purpose of education?  Why might innovation be crucial in education?

For me, the purpose of education is simple:  for teaching and learning!  Schools offer places and content for all kinds of students whether you are in Kindergarten or working on your second Masters Degree.  Innovation is crucial in education because the students of today aren't the same as the students of past years.  We can't keep teaching and "playing school" the same way it's always been done for the sake of tradition.  In order to continue to be relevant and meaningful in 2017, schools must embrace change and innovation.


2. 
change
“Change is an opportunity to do something amazing.”  How are you embracing change to spur innovation in your own context?
Change is something I personally have always embraced and found quite exciting.  I've never been the one to stay at in a position or school for many years or even teach or do things the same way.  My longest stint was 8 years at the same school.  Currently, I'm embracing change with a new career pathway in education and I haven't looked back once.  The change in what I'm doing on a day to day basis has definitely afforded me new opportunities of looking at education through different lenses and learning from a multitude of new mentors.  One of the reasons I pursued this new job was because of my admiration for the private company.  I felt they were being innovative and offering solutions and help for problems found in education and technology integration.  Working with a variety of people has spurred innovation as we feed off each other for creativity and inspiration.  
3. If you started a school from scratch, what would you see as necessary, and what would you take out from what we currently do?

I recently participated in a discussion that asked a similar question.  It's definitely easier to start with what I would remove from traditional education.  I would get rid of grades and go with mastery learning instead.  I would also remove the rigid standards of grade levels and make it a more fluid setting where students could move back and forth depending on needs. (That seems to go right along with mastery learning!)  I would also remove the ideas/standards that certain curriculum takes an entire school year to cover and let students work at their own pace.  I know there are other things I would want to remove, but obviously mastery learning is on my brain right now!  Flexible spaces and non traditional "classroom" looking spaces would also be necessary.

If starting a school from scratch, what would I see as necessary?  Amazing teachers, of course! 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Review: Attachments

Attachments by Rainbow Rowell

My rating: 5 of 5 stars



I'm not sure why I waited to read this book. I had heard others mention they loved ALL of Rainbow Rowell's books, even her "adult" one, Attachments. (Side note: Why does mentioning it's an adult book sound so dirty?! It's not at all. It's just not a YA book. It's actually cleaner than many of the YA books I've read...) Anyway, I requested this title from my library and was pleased to pick it up a few days ago. I immediately began reading it. It was a breath of fresh air for me. Perhaps because the characters WERE adults, and not angst-ridden teens or supernatural beings, or any of the other stereotypes it seems like I've been reading too much of lately...

Rainbow Rowell has a way of writing characters that you wish you knew in real life. They're interesting, sincere, and realistic. I especially enjoyed the format of this book with the many emails between Jennifer and Beth. Lin…

1-2-3 Wonder

Collaborating is one of the aspects of teaching that I most enjoy.  As a school librarian, I have the unique opportunity to collaborate, teach, and work with many different teachers and students in my school building, grades K-12.  This school year, one of my professional goals is to collaborate outside of my school and even outside of Indiana. 

When David Etkin mentioned on Twitter that he had an idea for a Wonder extension lesson, I immediately said "I'm in!"  We talked it out a bit and decided to recruit a few more people to the collaborating party from the #WONDERschools initiative.  Davidforced  persuaded Reilly into participating in this project with her 5th grade students.  

We worked together in Google Docs on the lesson idea, questions, and discussed how to best implement this in our classrooms.   Then we decided how to combine and showcase what was done in each of our classes. The cool part of this collaboration was that we used several methods of communication: …

Totoro #PostItNoteArt

Our post-it note art for the fourth 9 weeks this school year is from the movie My Neighbor Totoro.  It seemed to be a bigger undertaking than usual.  I think the main reason for this was because we had to alter the patterns quite a bit to fit our windows.  This always presents a challenge to keep the scale the same and make sure the finished art is still recognizable.  Connolly does a great job with this and usually eyeballs the changes.  I, on the other hand, prefer to be able to follow the pattern row by row.

Time wise, the three forest spirits were created in about six total hours.

Finished windows:


Daughter finished the #Totoro #PostitNoteArt on our library windows. Like every one we've created, it's now my favorite. 💙 (Top: view from hallway; bottom: view inside library) #myneighbortotoro #myfriendtotoro #TotoroSocietyART #TotoroisHere #RMHSLibrary @postit
A photo posted by Sherry Gick (@sngick) on Apr 21, 2016 at 1:14pm PDT
A few videos of the process:  (It's always…